Welcome to Momardi! Tuesday's Visual Art blog in London.
A Digital Hub for Contemporary Artists and Art lovers

Rig: The Anti-Monumental and Ambiguous Phyllida Barlow at the Hauser & Wirth

October 20, 2011
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Rig: The Anti-Monumental and Ambiguous Phyllida Barlow at the Hauser & Wirth

There's something about artists that get discovered quite late in life - they are like wine, they get better with age - such as the late Louise Bourgeois who became a critically-acclaimed artist at the age of 70 and went on to change the face of modern and contemporary art.

Phyllida Barlow seems to be the next Bourgeois, in the same breadth of class and momentum. According to this article, Phyllida was an art teacher to the likes of Angela de la Cruz and Rachel Whiteread and only started to receive some acclaim well into her retirement age. But seeing her show at the Hauser and Wirth, there's no doubt we are just seeing the tip of the iceberg of Phyllida's art. (more…)

Degas: More than Just a Genius of Movement

October 15, 2011
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Degas: More than Just a Genius of Movement

It is hard to imagine a world without Monet and his water lilies, and so much more without Edgar Degas and his ballerinas. Ever since I saw Degas' works at the Musee d' Orsay, I was introduced to a fascinating behind-the-scenes world of ballet dancers, which were more interesting than the actual spectacle.  

Clearly, ballet was the domain of Edgar Degas,  who was known to be a fixture of the Paris Opera in the late 19th century in his attempt to capture movement and beauty.  But in this exhibit at the Royal Academy of Art, there was so much more about Degas that I didn't know.  I expected only to be bombarded by images of ballerinas, but the  exhibit also focused  on his  creative process and his experimentation with the technological advances of his time. (more…)

Over and Out: The End of The Shape of Things to Come at the Saatchi

October 10, 2011
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Over and Out: The End of The Shape of Things to Come at the Saatchi

I can't help feeling pessimistic seeing the exhibit Shape of Things to Come at the Saatchi Gallery. In some way, I'm glad that it would soon be over and that contemporary art would hopefully come back to being glorious. With warped cars, ghost-like wax figures, unfired clay female nudes and orgies of faceless sculptures,  there's nothing more depressing than having this exhibit tell me that contemporary sculpture has completely lost its faith in its own self and society.

But I have tenacious unbendable belief in the brighter side of things so I am always quick to circumvent these kinds of disastrous thoughts. The only way for me to appreciate The Shape of Things to Come is to look for my favorite pieces and not view the exhibit as one whole picture. So here are my favorites: (more…)

RIP Steve Jobs: Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish, Never Settle

October 6, 2011
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RIP Steve Jobs: Stay Hungry, Stay Foolish, Never Settle

This blog would not have existed in the first place if it weren't for the many creative individuals that continue to inspire me until today. And one of these people was no other than Steve Jobs - the visionary of Apple who died yesterday at the age of 56, (such a short time here on earth!) but whose legacy will live on for generations. He was a personal hero of my father (an advertising executive in the Philippines), who  once told me that he wouldn't mind working for Steve serving him coffee.

I am a fan of Apple products - I literally wake up looking at my Ipod and use it watching videos before I sleep so it has become a huge part of my life. These gadgets have revolutionized our lives in the 21st century but more than that, I love the idea that Apple was headed by a cult figure like Steve Jobs. I honestly think that there is no giant corporation here on Earth headed by a leader as inspiring as Steve. (more…)

See the Indonesian Eye on its Last Week at the Saatchi

October 4, 2011
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See the Indonesian Eye on its Last Week at the Saatchi

It seems that the Saatchi gallery's venture into the world of contemporary South-east Asian art is proving to be very successful. In 2009, Korean eye: Moon Generation 2009 attracted 250,000 visitors according to one blog and even spawned a sequel last year with the Korean eye: Fantastic Ordinary, which by the way I swooned over as I got a chance to see works from  the best emerging artists in Korea and who as a result of this exhibit, eventually became world-renowned artists.

This year and (also on its last week), artists from Indonesia are featured in Indonesian Eye: Fantasies and Realities at the Saatchi gallery sponsored by Prudential Life. While one Western critic already lambasted it for failing to impress, I beg to disagree. (more…)

Interview: Olga Gouskova Talks about the Female Form

October 2, 2011
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Interview: Olga Gouskova Talks about the Female Form

Sometimes artists are not very comfortable with interviews and one them is Russian-born Belgium-based artist Olga Gouskova. She told me she was a better painter than a writer and in a sense, was probably reluctant to explain her art through words. The good news is I'm not a critic and I just love art in general so I understand her uneasiness. In her Facebook profile, she even posted this quote from Pablo Picasso. "As far as I am concerned, a painting speaks for itself. What is the use of giving explanations, when all is said and done? A painter has only one language."

But the following interview was in fact, a good overview of her creative process, her blooming career and why one critic even branded her art as having hints of Botticelli's. Her concept of femininity is not a typical  take on beauty but as an extension of her own self (more…)

Kafka’s Metamorphosis at the Royal Opera House

September 28, 2011
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Kafka’s Metamorphosis at the Royal Opera House

So violent and disturbing the body contortions were when George Samsa finally mutates into a man-like insect in  the new  play Metamorphosis at the Royal Opera House, that my eyes popped out and my jaw dropped to the floor seeing Franz Kafka's literary work interpreted with a new stage of physicality that will shake your existential sensations to the core. 

I really had no idea know how they would pull this off without using wild insect-costumes and props but Edward Watson, Royal Ballet's principal dancer, only uses his body and his extreme level of flexibility to breathe life into the role of Georg Samsa.  He contorts and folds his body into shapes that simulate insect movement: pulling and coiling his limbs, his hands become crabbed claws, his toes moving individually just like when a real insect does with its legs (more…)