Category: Museum

Phyllida Barlow – Tate Britain Commission 2014

Apr 26, 2014
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Phyllida Barlow – Tate Britain Commission 2014

Phyllida Barlow's new commission at the Duveen galleries at Tate Britain is large, messy, unstable and chaotic. But despite the disarray and all the cardboard, timber and rope hanging about on top of me, it gives a sense that it's all contained chaos. The premise of it all is to address space and how I and the rest of the visitors - who are as perplexed as I was - would interact and get our heads around what's hanging about us.

Where does one start? There is no chronological narrative in this pandemonium and there is nothing beautiful about this monumental sculpture. It's a miss-mash of bricolage, a factory of unfinished or abandoned collage slapped all together in one set by pure chance and without actual intent Read More »

Design Museum: Seven Category winners – Design of the Year 2013 Awards

Apr 14, 2013
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Design Museum: Seven Category winners –  Design of the Year 2013 Awards

The 'Designs of the Year' winners have just been announced - covering seven categories in the field of architecture, product, fashion, digital, fashion, transport and graphics. Some of my favourite designs did not win - like Heatherwick's Olympic cauldron or Olafur Eliasson's Little Sun - but this does not diminish the fact that these are great designs that have made a powerful impact in society and our consciousness. Who can get the cauldron out of his mind after seeing that monumental candelabra which opened the London 2012 Games?

But this year's winners all deserve to win. I've added the pics of the winners below but it's better to book yourself a ticket to the Design Museum to see them for yourself. You might have your own favourites (like I do!)  that might not have made the cut. (Read my next article on who are my favourites). Read More »

Top Five Art Sites for the Armchair Art Aficionado

Feb 23, 2013
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Top Five Art Sites for the Armchair Art Aficionado

I think we can all agree that this cold weather is just hanging about too long and we all really need to do some flash mob sun salutation to lure back the sun god Ra. If someone please ask Olafur Eliasson to bring back The Weather Project this week at the Tate, then I'd be more than pleased to go out and see a good art exhibition - artificial sunlight and all. But laziness plagues a dampened spirit and my best friend these days is none other than my armchair.

Manet, Lichtenstein and Man Ray can all wait (great exhibitions around the city)- but here are some sites that you need to see when it's just too cold to go out. At least, you don't need to shell £15 to see some great masterpieces (and in your pyjamas!) Read More »

My Favourite 15 Picks from Gerhard Richter’s Panorama

Dec 8, 2011
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My Favourite 15 Picks from Gerhard Richter’s Panorama

Gerhard Richter's latest retrospective at the Tate clearly shows that his art sits in the middle ground between abstraction and realism. For almost 50 years of his career, Richter has not only mastered all the genres of painting but has also contributed to the major art movements of our time.  Name any contemporary style and possibly Richter has already laid the groundwork before anybody else. And this is  why it comes as no surprise that Panorama  is the most eclectic collection a single artist can ever have in a lifetime.

In fact, if you didn't know about Gerhard Richter, you'd probably think the collection at the Tate was done by several people. And yet for all its eclecticism and diversity, there is still a stamp of Richterness about all of them. Whether it be Read More »

Starving Myself with Joan Miró´s Retrospective at the Tate Modern

May 14, 2011
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Starving Myself with Joan Miró´s Retrospective at the Tate Modern

Hunger is the word I would describe Joan Miró´s retrospective at the Tate Modern. Not because I came there with an empty stomach and could hear it growling (I was starved, yes and could eat a horse, but that´s really beside the point) ---  but it is really hunger which drove Miro to find his own pictorial language. He went literally famished in his experiments with surreallism often recording his hallucinations brought by hunger on paper. In fact, it was his muse. “Hunger was a great source of hallucinations. I would sit for long periods looking at the bare walls of my studio trying to capture these shapes on paper or burlap,” he said.

This going beyond the extreme resulted in a massive artistic output of more than 2,000 paintings for 70 years of his life until his death in 1983. He painted daily, driven by an inner hunger to widen the scope of visual perception. André Breton called him "the most surreal of us all." Read More »